Forging deep connections – it’s human nature

One of the very best things about life at the moment is how new connections are being made across communities of all shapes and sizes.

I have been involved recently in pairing up volunteers with elderly friends who live alone and need help with shopping, medicine collection and other essentials. Individuals who live close to each other, but who have never previously met, are now finding new ways to come together.  It’s a marvellously uplifting beacon of light in what can otherwise feel like dark times.

And here’s another story of connection and community support.  The short film below is a wonderful breath of air and a celebration of all that is good about we humans.  Set on the Isle of Harris, it reminds me of fabulous the holiday which Hub and I had there a couple of years ago.  We were staying on the other side of the island from the location of this film.  But one of the intriguing local landmarks was the local postbox, which was emptied daily, even though we were at the end of a long and winding track (see featured image).

We have all rightly been clapping for NHS staff and healthcare workers in recent weeks.  And last week’s clap was additionally for all the amazing key workers who are keeping essential services going.  Staff across all parts of society, working in vital areas such as food shops and chemists; cleaners; dustbin collectors and of course our intrepid posties – they are all heroes who deserve our grateful thanks.

 

 

15 thoughts on “Forging deep connections – it’s human nature

  1. Gorgeous landscape, Liz. I’ve long appreciated my postie for all the parcels he, and occasionally she, lugged up the hill to where I live when I was a books reviews editor. Not a job I could have done on Harris before the advent of the ebook. Always a bottle of wine for them from me at Xmas!

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What a Postman! All above people we rely on so massively deserve our thanks not only now but always. We seem to only realise it now. So it is lovely to say thanks to them or give a little something – as it was always done by my mum in my childhood. I am continuing this and see nice smiles.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. This is a remarkable film. Don & I watched it several times just to immerse ourselves in the story and beauty of location. Both of us have lived in isolated communities in Northern Manitoba and the Northwest Territories of Canada. Links to the outside were invaluable. The road finally came to my small mining community the year that I left to go to University in Winnipeg. That road changed everything. Yes!!! We are all connected to the story of humanity.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. What an amazing story – you really must podcast about that! Meanwhile, I will dream about one day walking the postman’s path….. xxx

      Like

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