Six Degrees of Separation: From Eats, Shoots and Leaves to The Golden Thread

Six Degrees of Separation is a monthly meme hosted by Kate over at BooksAreMyFavouriteAndBest. She sets the starting point and participants add six more titles linked in any way they choose.

This month we start with Eats, Shoots and Leaves, a great book about English grammar by Lynne Truss. I remember reading and enjoying it when it was first published. But then I am a total grammar nerd (split infinitive, anyone?), so I was definitely its target audience.

Thinking about the English language put me in mind of an excellent-sounding book that I have on my non-fiction TBR list about the origins of writing: The Golden Thread by Ewan Clayton.

And where might one do one’s writing? Doris Lessing has the right idea with her 1960s novel The Golden Notebook. I have copies of both this book, and several gorgeous, as yet pristine notebooks. I must get them all out some time.

Meanwhile, Lessing’s novel is set in London, as is The Golden Bowl by Henry James. I have recently been looking at James’ work, having heard a recommendation for The Aspern Papers (check out this wonderful episode of Tea, Toast and Trivia). The Golden Bowl looks like a great read too.

A key part of the plot of The Golden Bowl appears to hinge on secrets and mistrust. Similar narrative devices are used by Francis Spufford in Golden Hill, in which a stranger turns up in an 18th century counting house claiming to have an order for a thousand pounds in his pocket. Can this be true….?

Pockets are (usually) made out of fabric, which gives me a link to my final book. Kassia St Clair has written an amazing-sounding book about how fabric changed the course of history called, yes, The Golden Thread. Thus we can neatly close the loop on this ‘all that glitters’ chain – always a very satisfying bonus!

Next month, we’ll be starting with Postcards From The Edge by Carrie Fisher. See you then! 😀

22 thoughts on “Six Degrees of Separation: From Eats, Shoots and Leaves to The Golden Thread

  1. I’ve read and really liked Golden Notebook, I wish more people talked about Lessing’s work. And Golden Thread talks about the “origins of writing”? Sounds fascinating, I’m going to check that out.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. wow, so many great titles here, with the same word, and even two with the same titles. I was actually amazed at the number of books with Golden Thread in the title!!
    I added Clayton’s to my TBR, thanks. I also love so much that type of content.
    I was curious and checked: I have read 6 books with the word golden in the title. I highly recommend Reflections in a Golden Eye, by Carson McCullers; and Mrs. Pollifax and the Golden Triangle (Mrs. Pollifax #8), by Dorothy Gilman
    Here’s my post: https://wordsandpeace.com/2021/07/03/six-degrees-of-separation-from-typos-to-russia/

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m really pleased you enjoyed the chain, and thanks so much for sharing those extra titles which I will check out. They both sound great!

      Like

  3. What a wonderful chain full of golden links, Liz! I also enjoyed Eats, Shoots and Leaves when it first came out; I love books about grammar, etymology and language. I have read a lot of Henry James but not The Golden Bowl or The Aspern Papers. In fact it was Henry James that caused my first husband to speak to me and ask me out! I was reading Portrait of a Lady in my lunch break at work and he had studied it at university and loved it. I have only read one of Francis Spufford’s books and that is Unapologetic. I nearly read two; I bought Richard Backroom Boys and hoped to read it after him but he got rid of it before I could (I don’t think he even read it!). Both your Golden Thread books sound really fascinating.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. How clever! A sparkling golden chain! Having read Light Perpetual I’m keen to read Golden Hill but the one which really catched my eye in your cahin, Liz, is the Clayton. It’s – apostrophe hopefully in the right place – been duly added to the tbr 😊

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Aw thanks so much, Sandra. And haha re the apostrophe – I must admit to reading and re-reading my post even more carefully this time round!! I’ll definitely be trying to get around to the Clayton too, and I’m pleased to have your Spufford endorsement. 😀

      Liked by 1 person

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