The Rations Challenge: Forty Days of Feasting in a Wartime Kitchen by Claud Fullwood

I’m not exactly sure what drew me to Claud Fullwood’s forthcoming book The Rations Challenge.  Perhaps it was my general and ongoing interest in how to make even a small contribution to addressing climate change.  Little did I know that this would turn out to be the perfect read for completely different reasons.

As the blurb for this book explains:

“Food is always a hot topic – Food waste, food banks, food miles, local versus imported. As we all need food, we can’t ignore it.  But as some families struggle without enough food to live on, others are challenged to consider how much they throw away, or how to make the food they have go further. Which is why Claud Fullwood set herself the challenge of living on World War Two rations for Lent. It opened her eyes not only to issues of hunger and waste, but also to the many ways in which we have the power to fix our groaning food system, make our families stronger and our communities whole again.  The Rations Challenge takes the wisdom of World War Two and looks at how it can help us revolutionise how we live now. By learning the lessons our parents and grandparents lived by in the ’30s and ’40s, we can build a future that works for everyone.”

Continue reading “The Rations Challenge: Forty Days of Feasting in a Wartime Kitchen by Claud Fullwood”

“There is not a thing that is more positive than bread.” – Fyodor Dostoevsky. Part two of my bread making odyssey

Last week I wrote about baking by hand my first ever loaf of bread. It was instantly addictive and so I was back in the kitchen this weekend to have another go.

Continue reading ““There is not a thing that is more positive than bread.” – Fyodor Dostoevsky. Part two of my bread making odyssey”

Kitchen Capers: making my first ever loaf of bread

I have been having great fun in the kitchen today. And the best bit about it? Eating the fruits of one’s labours of course!

For a while now I have been wanting to have a go at making bread. We have a perfectly good bread maker which we use occasionally. But having watched tons of cookery programmes on TV over the years, as well as reading about how amazing it is to make one’s own bread, I decided to give it a try and see for myself.

Using the ‘Basic White Load’ recipe from James Morton’s fantastic and easy to follow book Brilliant Bread, I managed to produce this little beauty:

Continue reading “Kitchen Capers: making my first ever loaf of bread”

Baking ‘Priorities’!

Following on from my last post about my recent baking activities, in which I confessed to adding extra whisky to one of my cakes, my lovely Mum reminded me of this classic joke recipe – enjoy!

 

Fruitcake Recipe

Ingredients:

1 cup water
1 cup sugar
4 large eggs
2 cups candied fruit
1 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup brown sugar
lemon juice
nuts
1 bottle whisky (sample the whisky to check for quality)

Directions:

1. Take a large bowl. Check the whisky again – to be sure it is the highest quality, pour one level cup and drink. Repeat.
2. Turn on the electric mixer, beat one cup of butter in a large fluffy bowl.
3. Add one teaspoon of sugar and beat again.
4. Make sure the whisky is still okay. Cry another tup.
5. Turn off the mixer.
6. Break two leggs and add to the bowl and chuck in the cup of candied fruit.
7. Mix on the turner. If the fried druit gets stuck in the beaterers, pry it loose with a drewscriver.
8. Sample the whisky to check for tonsisticity.
9. Next, sift two cups of salt. Or something. Who cares?
10. Check the whisky.
11. Now sift the lemon juice and strain your nuts.
12. Add one table. Spoon. Of sugar or something. Whatever you can find.
13. Grease the oven.
14. Turn the cake tin to 350 degrees. Don’t forget to beat off the turner.
15. Throw the bowl out of the window, check the whisky again and go to bed.

🥃😂🥃🤣🥃😜